Call for submission of good practice (case studies) in mainstreaming disability inclusion in the climate change and DRR policies

9/17/2018
Background
Most Pacific Island Countries have a national disability policy. However, findings from the review of disability inclusive development in the Pacific by UNESCO in 2017 show that the extent to which disability inclusive development is integrated into national sustainable development plans differs across the Pacific Island nations. In some national plans, disability is recognised as a cross-cutting issue, whereas in other countries, the rights of persons with disabilities are only referenced under certain policy objectives or goals but do not mainstream the rights of persons with disability. Research in 2012 by PDF noted the lack of commitment and capacity to include disability into government’s national development and sectoral strategies[1].
The extent to which the rights of persons with disabilities are reflected in national climate change and disaster risk reduction (DRR) policies varies. Several Pacific Island Countries’ climate change policies emphasise equitable inclusion for all including persons with disabilities as overarching policy guidelines. Others address the inclusion of persons with disabilities in concrete climate change policy actions in awareness raising, education and community relocation. At the same time, there are climate change policies in which the rights of persons with disabilities are not explicitly mentioned. Mainstreaming disability inclusion is essentially about bringing persons with disabilities explicitly into all related discourses. This ensures that persons with disabilities are able to engage in decision making process, starting from the planning to implementation, monitoring and evaluation phase, in the area of climate change and DRR.
 
All Pacific Island Countries have identified a disability focal point in the government whose roles are to ensure the inclusion of the rights of persons with disabilities in policies and programmes. Findings from the review of disability inclusive development in the Pacific by UNESCO in 2017 show that a number of countries, such as PNG, Fiji, Cook Islands and Samoa, have set up coordination mechanism in place consisting of government, DPOs and other civil society and service provider representatives to ensure the inclusion of the rights of persons with disabilities in policies and programmes.
This shows that there are good practices already in place in the region in the integration of the rights of persons with disabilities in climate change adaptation policies and programmes. These practices are, however, have yet to be consolidated to understand the experience of disability inclusion in climate change and disaster risk reduction from the Pacific perspective. It is critical to document and share good practices of countries and DPOs in the mainstreaming of and advocacy for disability inclusion in the national development framework. This allows the identification of building blocks and guidelines for DPOs and disability focal points to advocate for the integration of disability in the wider development framework in the Pacific.
Therefore this call for Submission aims to:
i. Document good practices of DPOs, Disability focal points, CSOs, governments and other stakeholders in the Pacific, in advocating for the mainstreaming of disability inclusion in national development framework focussing on climate change adaptation and mitigation.
ii. Develop guidelines for DPOs and disability focal points to better advocate for integrating the rights of persons with disabilities in the development framework, based on the collected good practices.
The call for good practices of mainstreaming disability inclusion extend to interventions by state and non-state actors in climate change adaptation and mitigation and disaster risk reduction. The good practices must be concrete examples of ways in which a disability lens and the perspective of persons with disabilities are incorporated in policies and programmes[2]. The examples can be any interventions by state and non-state actors including but not limited to policy development, policy advocacy, capacity building, awareness raising, knowledge production or service provision, which make provisions for and address the needs and rights of persons with disabilities in climate change adaptation and mitigation and disaster risk reduction. The good practices can be at any levels, whether being disability mainstreaming in national strategies, sectoral action plans and policies for climate change and DRR or local and grassroots level interventions.
What can be good practices?
United Nation’s report on Best Practices for Including Persons with Disabilities in All Aspects of Development Efforts emphasizes that national development strategies and plans in various aspects of development should integration disability rights and allow for persons with disabilities’ participation in design, implementation and monitoring. In the Pacific Framework for the Rights of persons with disabilities, mainstreaming is understood as integrating recommendations of international human rights mechanism such as CRPD and UPR into national development plans, strategies, legislation and programmes. This means that effective mainstreaming requires policies, programmes, interventions and services to make provision for and address the needs and rights of persons with disabilities.
Examples of good practices are those which[3]:
· Allow or create opportunities for persons with disabilities, especially women, to participate equally and without discrimination in designing climate change and DRR policies and programmes, especially in aspects that concern them.
· Engaging persons with disabilities, especially women, actively in the decision-making process in the implementation of projects/programmes and policies and creating accountability mechanisms for monitoring, complaint and feedback.
· Identify risks and drivers of exclusion of persons with disabilities, especially women, in climate change and DRR policies and programmes and remove such drivers of exclusion.
· Increase awareness and understanding of disability at organizational, community and institutional levels so as to promote the inclusion of disability in the national policies and action plans related to climate change and disaster risk reduction.
· Promote in-country coherence and coordination at the national, sub-regional and regional level integrating recommendations of international human rights mechanism such as CRPD and UPR into national development plans, strategies, legislation and programmes.
· Build institutional capacity of relevant stakeholders to apply a disability lens in climate change and DRR related interventions.
· Collecting integrated data for policy from both official and non-official sources which show the disaggregated impacts of climate change and DRR policies and programmes on persons with disabilities.
· Advocate for tailored policy design and implementation which adopts international human rights mechanism and the twin track approach in the areas of climate change and DRR.
· Ensure equal access for persons with disabilities to the physical environment, transportation, information and communications, including information technologies and systems, and other facilities and services related to climate change adaptation and mitigation and DRR open or provided to the public in urban, remote and rural settings.
Interested Parties are invited to consider
1. Providing evidence of current actions on climate change adaptation and mitigation and disaster risk reduction and management that reflects the needs and aspirations of persons with disabilities
2. Highlighting how the action is mainstreaming the inclusion of persons with disabilities in climate change and disaster risk reduction policies and programmes in various stages including design, implementation and monitoring and evaluation.
3. How these actions contribute to the achievement of the purpose of the Sustainable Development Goals to ‘leave no one behind’
4. Highlighting how persons with disabilities are effectively participating in these actions
5. Identifying gaps in mainstreaming persons with disabilities in climate change and disaster risk management frameworks while implementing these actions
Submit Written Evidence
Interested parties are invited to keep to a maximum of 2000 words and focus on the key points listed above
The deadline for submission is Friday, 9th of November 2018, however submission of written evidence before the due date is highly appreciated.
Please send your written submission by email to rcperu@pacificdisability.org or by post to P.O Box 18458, Suva Fiji. Please note to label the submission “Call for Best Practices in Mainstreaming Disability in Climate Change and DRR”.
Written Submission Guideline
It will assist the Pacific Disability Forum if the written submission adhere to the following guidelines.
· State clearly who the submission is from by including the name of the organisation, and your base country.
· Be concise – we recommended no more than 2000 words in length
· Clear identify the actions and provide evidence of its implementation and impacts on persons with disabilities
· Include a brief introduction about your organisation
· Include key factual information which the Pacific Disability Forum be able to draw conclusions to contribute to the guideline on mainstreaming disability inclusion in the climate change policy framework
· Have numbered paragraphs indicating each actions and supporting explanations and evidence
If you believe you have a strong case study but do not have the time or human resources to document it, please contact us so that we can discuss with you how we might be able to provide support. We don’t want a good story to be missed! ______________________________________________________________
[1] PDF, 2012, “Mapping of disability policy and program frameworks in the Pacific”
[2] Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat, n.d., “Pacific Framework for the Rights of Persons with Disabilities 2016-25”
[3] The examples of good practices are based on UNESCO’s Analytical Framework for Inclusive Policy Design and the United Nations’ Best Practices for Including Persons with Disabilities in All Aspects of Development Efforts